Go to Top

New Book on Food Systems and Indigenous Peoples

A new publication edited by Harriet Kuhnlein, Chief Bill Erasmus, Dina Spigelski and Barbara Burlingame will be launched on May 25 in New York, at the United Nations Plaza. The event will happen at 10.30 AM during the gathering of the United Nations Permanent Forum on Indigenous Issues.

The book is a product of a series of in-depth studies conducted by a team of representatives from 12 Indigenous Peoples and researchers from the Centre for Indigenous Peoples’ Nutrition and Environment (CINE). The findings obtained so far have been released in three books, with the support of the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations (FAO): the first two books define the process to document local food resources and describe the food systems in 12 diverse rural areas of different parts of the world.

i3144e00Indigenous Peoples’ food systems & well-being: interventions & policies for healthy communities is the third of the series, released this month. It presents the results of 10 years research on community health promotion interventions based on local and traditional food systems. It provides an exhaustive analysis of the contexts – from participatory processes, local knowledge, global overviews of Indigenous Peoples’ health circumstances, environmental concerns, and infant and child feeding practices – as well as nine specific case examples from Canada, Japan, Peru, India, Colombia, Thailand and the Federated States of Micronesia.

BOOK ABSTRACT

Indigenous Peoples in cultural homelands of the most rural areas of developing regions experience challenges in using their traditional food systems and to ensure food security and health despite the treasures of food biodiversity that could support well-being. This book is the third in a series promoting use of local food systems by Indigenous Peoples; the first defines the process to document local food resources, and the second describes food systems in 12 diverse rural areas of different parts of the world. Here we describe processes and findings from more than 40 interdisciplinary collaborators who created health promotion interventions for communities using local food systems. Included are participatory processes using local knowledge and activities specifically for local food; global overviews of Indigenous Peoples’ health circumstances, environmental concerns, and infant and child feeding practices; and nine specific case examples from Canada,

Japan, Peru, India, Colombia, Thailand and the Federated States of Micronesia. Common themes of successful interventions and evaluations are given along with chapters on human rights issues and implications for policies and strategies. Throughout the 10 years of this research we have shown the strength and promise of local traditional food systems to improve health and well-being. This work is in context of the second United Nations’ International Decade of the World’s Indigenous Peoples and the Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples.

 

The book is available for download at FAO’s website.

, ,

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *